FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)

Interested in the Family Scouting and Scout Me In Programs?
You’ve got questions; We’ve got answers.

Program & Materials  |  Leaders & Training  |  Camping

Family Scouting

  • Q: What if my pack is not interested in participating in Family Scouting?

    A: Every chartered partner chooses which Scouting programs to utilize for their community, and each unit should work with their chartered partner to discuss which approach is best for the youth and families they seek to serve. If a unit wants to remain an all-boy pack with all-boy dens, that decision is entirely welcome.

  • Q: How should we approach a chartered partner that does not want to offer Family Scouting? Should we start a separate pack nearby?

    A: Chartered partners can choose which programs to offer and whether they want to offer Family Scouting or remain focused on all-boy programs. If the chartered partner has made a well-informed decision to focus on all-boy programs, we recommend working with your district or council membership teams to identify new unit development opportunities using resources found at www.scouting.org/marketing such as the Market Analysis Report.

  • Q: Is there an incentive for units that offer Family Scouting programs?

    A: There will not be an incentive to offer Family Scouting, but we are looking at options to commemorate those who participate in Family Scouting program in this first year.

  • Q: What are the council’s responsibilities in offering programs to girls?

    A: The responsibility of the council does not change with the invitation to girls to join our programs. Just as before, a council will be expected to offer uphold membership and program standards, market analysis, support units, seek opportunities for new units, and developing and training leaders to offer a quality program.

  • Q: What is the application process to register girls?

    A: The online registration system will be ready to accept girl applications for units that have been identified as eligible by their councils and chartered partners. If online registration is not possible due to technology restraints or where paper applications have already been completed, the registrar are welcome to contact member care at the National Service Center for any support they need in processing the applications.

  • Welcome to Cub Scouting

    Welcome to Cub Scouting Video

Program and Materials Q&A

  • Q: Will the program change to accommodate girls joining Cub Scouts?

    A: No, the activities that Cub Scouts do and the advancement requirements will not change; they will be the same as the current requirements.

  • Q: Will there be separate handbooks for boys and girls?

    A: No. The advancement program will be the same for all Scouts.

  • Q: Will there be a separate uniform for girls?

    A: Participants will use all currently existing materials, including the current Cub Scout uniforms and handbooks.

    All uniforms continue to be reviewed and adjusted to meet participant needs. While the fit and styling may be a bit different, the uniforms will remain fundamentally the same.

  • Q: Will the advancement requirements or award names be changed?

    A: Requirements for Adventure Trails in Cub Scouting will not change. Two Arrow of Light Adventure Trails will be renamed:  Outdoorsman will become “Outdoor Adventurer” and Sportsman will simply become “Sports”.

  • Q: What efforts are being taken to ensure that girls are welcomed appropriately into Scouting?

    A: The values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law should guide our actions, and Scouts and Scouters that live by those tenants will be well-suited to welcome all families and children into Scouting.

  • Q: What is the BSA doing to change perceptions of Scouting so that girls interested in joining are not ridiculed by their peers for taking an interest in something that was previously just for boys?

    A: While the organization is looking into a number of opportunities to showcase the benefits and opportunities of Scouting for both young women and men, Scouts and Scouters in the local community are also able to make great strides through the acts of being friendly, brave, and kind that are the foundation of a Scout’s character. Showing how Scouting builds character in leadership in youth is one of the best ways to explain why Scouting is appealing to both boys and girls.

    The mission of the BSA is to instill values in young people, and the values we seek to instill are those found in the Scout Oath and Scout Law.  These values are relevant for both boys and girls to become adults with strong character.  With decades of serving young women in Exploring, Venturing, and Sea Scouting, we already have a great success stories that can be told by those women who benefited from these programs.

Leaders & Training Q&A

  • Q: What new or updated training will be available for leaders?

    A: Training resources such as Den Leader and Cubmaster training are being updated to align with advancement changes that were made prior to welcoming girls into Cub Scouting.  In addition, the images for the training will reflect the diverse markets we seek to serve.

Youth Protection Q&A

  • Q: What changes are anticipated for YPT as we welcome girls to packs?

    A: All leaders that work with youth must be current in Youth Protection Training prior to delivering the program.  Pack and den leaders agree to uphold membership policies and the structure of all-boy dens and all-girl dens.

    In Cub Scouting, overnight and outdoor activities are designed for the whole family. Parents attend overnight activities with their child. Male and female adult leaders must be present for all overnight Cub Scouting trips and outings, even those including parent and child, unless all youth and adults are the same gender. Both male and female adult leaders must be 21 years of age or older and currently Youth Protection trained, and one must be a registered member of the BSA.  A parent may assist their child in matters of health and safety, as long as it does not infringe upon the privacy of others.

  • Q: Are female leaders required for packs that will include girl dens?

    A: Similar to policies that apply to Venturing, adult female supervision will be required for Cub Scouting activities that involve female Cub Scouts. This supervision can be a parent or legal guardian of a Cub Scout who is Youth Protection-trained, but does not need to be a registered leader.

  • Q: Does this mean that a pack will have to bring at least four leaders on any activity to abide by two-deep leadership policies?

    A: No. If working with an all-girl den or pack, at least one of the leaders should be female or a Youth Protection-trained adult female must be present, so if you have an all-girl den that has two leaders who are male, then an adult female must be present.

Camping Q&A

  • Q: What facility changes will be made at camps?

    A: Current requirements for male and female adult facilities, as well as male and female youth facilities still apply. In Cub Scouting overnight and outdoor activities are designed for the whole family. Parents attend overnight activities with their child. Our current tenting policies remains in effect and those are:

    ‌ No adult may share a tent with the opposite sex unless he or she is that adult’s spouse.
    ‌ No youth may share a tent with an adult or person of the opposite sex other than a family member or guardian.
    ‌ Assigning youth members more than two years apart in age to sleep in the same tent should be avoided unless the youth are relatives.

    Whenever possible, separate shower and bathroom facilities should be provided for male adult and female adults, and male youth and female youth. If separate facilities are not available, separate shower times must be scheduled and clearly posted.

  • Q: What will happen at Day Camp if we only have a few girls and they are not of the same rank?

    A: Similar to policies that apply to Venturing, adult female supervision will be required for Cub Scouting activities that involve female Cub Scouts. This supervision can be a parent or legal guardian of a Cub Scout who is Youth Protection-trained, but does not need to be a registered leader.

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